Nearmap’s new product accelerates access to 3D imagery

By on 19 June, 2019

Nearmap 3D enables clients to stream and export 3D images on-request at a huge scale, through its MapBrowser web application.

Aerial imagery specialists Nearmap have unveiled their Nearmap 3D product at their recent Navig8 events around the country.

The launch represents a milestone for Nearmap, with the new product enables their customers to stream and export 3D images on-request at a huge scale through its MapBrowser web application.

Tony Agresta, executive vice president of product at Nearmap said that their new product had potential to transform the way industries such as construction, architecture, government and councils view and shape cities across Australia and the US.

“Nearmap 3D is the result of a significant investment in R&D, but also listening to our customers and what they need to transform the way they work,” he said.

“This represents the single largest, most frequently updated footprint of 3D accessible through a browser. The ability to measure in 3D space, size up an area and then export Nearmap 3D for use in other platforms will transform the aerial imagery market.”

According to Nearmap, users will be able to stream and explore immersive 3D imagery of cities in Australia and the US, measure distances and export in a variety of formats at high speed, with 400,000 square kilometres of coverage already available.

Also announced at Navig8 was another new project, built on custom machine learning models to build a ‘living’ dataset providing change detection services from previously captured imagery. Nearmap has analysed a million aerial images to date, and is now opening the product to customers in beta.

“We don’t prescribe how our technologies or content can be used by our customers,” said Dr Michael Bewley, director of AI systems at Nearmap.

“Our solar customers could use the AI technology to easily identify where and when solar panels have been installed for maintenance jobs, to prospect new clients in an area where solar energy’s popularity is on the rise; or a government entity that previously had the arduous task of tracking swimming pools or construction in their jurisdictions will be able to do it automatically.”

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