CSIRO and ANU launch biodiversity research centre

By on 2 April, 2013

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An initiative that will help Australia harness advances in biological sciences to inform better environmental management decision making will be announced tomorrow at the official launch of the Centre for Biodiversity Analysis, Canberra.

The Centre is a joint initiative established in partnership with CSIRO and the Australian National University (ANU).

“The Centre is drawing on CSIRO and ANU’s world class expertise, and harnessing new and emerging technologies in biodiversity science to improve our knowledge of Australia’s biodiversity, and enable governments and conservation NGOs to translate policy into meaningful actions,” said Professor Craig Moritz, Director of the Centre for Biodiversity Analysis.

“It’s estimated that Australia is home to over half a million unique living species, many of which are found nowhere else on Earth, but of these only about one third are known to science.”

“Improved knowledge of Australia’s biodiversity – how many species, where they are, and how they evolve across environments and through time – will be especially important to ensure sustainable development and production, to maximise ecosystem benefits, and to protect our unique diversity in the face of rapid environmental change,” he said.

CSIRO and the ANU have joined forces to address this challenge.

“The Centre will promote collaborative biodiversity science by hosting conferences and workshops, forming ANU-CSIRO working groups, supporting collaborative projects, connecting students and researchers with managers and policy makers, and facilitating the collation and connection of biodiversity information in the ANU-CSIRO Canberra Precinct,” said Professor Moritz.

The Centre also provides an early example of the value of the developing Canberra Global Research Precinct, which will focus on plant and environmental sciences. Like the Centre, the Precinct will be built on CSIRO-ANU collaboration, and will use its location in the national capital to promote the uptake of research outputs by government agencies.

The launch will also mark the opening of the Centre’s inaugural conference, which brings together Australian and international biodiversity scientists to discuss recent advances in biodiversity genomics.

“Genomics is an exciting and rapidly expanding field that has the potential to significantly improve the efficiency of environmental assessments and monitoring, and the speed at which new species can be identified,” said Professor Moritz.

“It is also providing important new insights into the ability of species to adapt to climate change.”

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